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AL&L CROP SOLUTIONS

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Address

7769 N. Meridian Rd.
Vacaville
CA, 95688
United States
Phone
(530) 387-3270
Fax
(707) 693-3050
Primary

About Us

Mission:

AL&L Crop Solutions is dedicated to providing plant disease diagnostic services to California's as well as other states' agricultural industry. From field to the laboratory, we work closely with you to ensure that your specific testing needs are met. We take pride in providing our customers with exceptional service, accurate test results and quick turnaround times at competitive rates. We utilize most current technologies and are staffed with experienced professionals having served agricultural industry for the past decade. Our close working relationship with UC scientists allows you an access to the most current research development in the field of plant disease diagnosis and control.

Technology:

PCR (polymerase chain reaction) is a technique that detects specific regions in pathogen genome and amplifies them to visible level.

ELISA(enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) is an immunoassay where pathogen-specific antibody is used to identify given pathogen's surface molecules.

Microscopic examination is used to identify signs of plant pathogens (fungi or bacteria) on symptomatic plant tissues. This may be done either by using a dissecting scope or a compound microscope.

Culturingis a method that is used to isolate fungi and bacteria from symptomatic plant tissue or soil. Selective or non-selective media may be used. Identification is based on the growth and morphological characters an organism produces on a given laboratory medium. Molecular identification (fingerprinting) may also be used.

 

Staff:

Anna-Liisa Fabritius, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist, UC Riverside

Lana Dubrovsky, Laboratory Manager, M.Sc., Moscow University of Fine Chemical Technology, Specialization in Biologically Active Substances

Accreditation, Certifications and Memberships:

-CDFA examined plant pathologist (Associate Plant Pathologist, Diagnostician)
-CDFA approved laboratory: Permit 57-7
-CDFA approved Rice blast testing staff for CCIA (California Crop Improvement Association)
-USDA Plant protection and quarantine (PPQ) permit for interstate movement of pest-infected plant material for diagnostic purposes: P526-10-00117
-USDA PPQ permit for interstate movement of cultures of certain bacterial pathogens: P526P-0903504
-American Phytopathological Society, Member
-Napa Valley Viticultural Association, Member

A plant disease diagnostic laboratory specializing in diseases of woody perennials: grapevines, fruit and nut trees


Grapevine Disease Testing:

Bacterial and Viral Disease testing

Fungal Disease testing

A variety of panels offered

 

Soil Pathogen Testing

AL&L offers testing for the most important soilborne fungal pathogens including:

Fusarium 

Macrophomina

Phytophthora

Phoma terrestris

Phytophthora

Pythium

Rhizoctonia

Sclerotinia

Sclerotium

Verticillium

 

Disease Testing for Field Crops

AL&L Crop Solutions offers testing for most of the diseases associated with the field crops.

Newest services: PCR assay for Verticillium wilt of Alfalfa hay

 

 Fruit and Nut Tree Disease Testing

Diagnosis and detection for the viral, bacterial and fungal diseases of fruit and nut trees

 

Spring Disease Symptoms
Spring Disease Symptoms
Napa Valley Viticulture Fair, November 2012
Napa Valley Viticulture Fair, November 2012
Black Foot Symptoms
Black Foot Symptoms
Pierce's Disease in Spring
Pierce's Disease in Spring
NEW Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) Test Available

Our lab is now testing for the Grapevine pinot gris virus (GPGV). This test can be added to an existing panel or tested individually. See below for a full list of Grapevine Disease Testing Services. 

GRAPEVINE DISEASE TESTING SERVICES

Bacterial and Viral Diseases:

  • NEW! Grapevine pinot gris virus (GPGV)
  • Grapevine Red Blotch associated virus (GRBaV) NEW! (Available individually or as part of the test panels)
  • Grapevine leafroll virus (GLRaV) types 1,2,3,4,5,7,9
  • Grapevine leafroll virus, Carnelian
  • Grapevine leafroll virus 2 RG-strain (GLRaV-2RG, Rootstock stem lesion associated virus)
  • Grapevine viruses A,B,D (GVA,GVB,GVD)
  • Grapevine rupestris stem pitting associated virus (RSPaV)
  • Grapevine rupestris stem pitting associated virus-Syrah strain (RSPaV-Sy)
  • Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV)
  • Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV)
  • Grapevine Syrah virus (GSyV-1)
  • Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV, grapevine yellow vein disease)
  • Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV)
  • Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV)
  • Agrobacterium (crown gall)
  • Xylella fastidiosa  (Pierce’s Disease)
  • Phytoplasmas

Fungal Diseases:

  • Vine Decline Fungi (Phaeoacremonium spp. and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora)
  • Canker diseases (Eutypa, Botryosphaeria, Phomopsis etc.)
  • Oak Root Disease (Armillaria mellea)
  • Black Foot Disease (Cylindrocarpon spp.)
  • Powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator)
  • Downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola)
  • Botrytis bunch rot (Botrytis cinerea)
  • Summer bunch rot (Cladosporium, Penicillium and others)
  • Phomopsis cane and leaf spot (Phomopsis viticola)

Panels Offered Test panels are flexible and may include any combinations of assays for specific testing needs:

  • Short Screen Panel (GLRaV 1-3, GVB; optional: GFLV, Xylella fastidiosa)
  • Wide Screen Panel GLRaV 1-9, GLRaV-2RG, GVA, GVB, GVD, RSPaV, GFkV, GFLV
  • Leafroll Panel GLRaV 1,2,3,4,5,7,9, GVB
  • Vine Decline Panel Phaeoacremonium spp., Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, Cylindrocarpon spp.
  • Spring Panel Nepoviruses including GFVL, ToRSV, TRSV, ArMV
  • Make-your-own Panel Allows you to design your own panel of tests

Individual tests also available!

Not sure which panel to pick? Let our experienced diagnosticians help you in choosing right sets of tests for your purposes.

On-site visits and diagnosis also available. 


News Archive


AL&L Crop Solutions Moves to a New Facility
06 June, 2017

To help better serve you, we are happy to announce that we are currently expanding our laboratory!

We are very excited to announce that our laboratory has moved to our new location! Please make sure to send all samples, inquires, and mail to our new address:

7769 N. Meridian Rd.

Vacaville, CA 95688

Tel: (530) 387-3270 

Fax: (707) 693-3050

Email: info@allcropsolutions.com

Thank you for your continued support and business! Please do not hesitate if you have any questions or need directions!

For more information, please click here.

 


Common Soil Pathogens
02 June, 2016

 Some economically important plant diseases are caused by pathogens that are present in soil. Many of these organisms have developed specialized survival structures such as hardened mycelial packs (sclerotia) or thick-walled spores (chlamydospores or oospores). These specialized structures assist their survival in harsh soil environment. Others remain as saprophytes, making their living by decaying dead plant tissues. Many of these so-called soilborne pathogens persist in soil over long period of time, from growing season to another, even if environmental conditions don’t support disease development. When optimal conditions (right moisture, temperature, and presence of a host plant) arise, these soil-borne pathogen structures often serve as source of inoculum for disease development.

Fusarium species cause root rot, wilt and yellows disease on many agronomic crops including onions, tomatoes, strawberries, Cole crops and Cucurbits.

Macrophomina phaeseolina is a causal agent of charcoal rot disease. This fungus has a wide host range, more than 500 species. It causes variety of symptoms, including seedling rots, root and stem rots and wilts. Hot weather promotes the disease development.

Phoma terrestris is a causal agent of onion pink root disease. It is also wide spread pathogen affecting several other crops such as cereals.

Phytophthora genus includes several economically important plant pathogens that cause blights, cankers and rots in various plant species. Production of vegetables, fruit trees and nursery industry are most commonly affected by these diseases.

Pythium species such as its relatives, Phytophthora spp., are water-loving organisms, many of which are plant pathogens. Pythium species commonly cause seed rots and damping-off of young seedlings. Mature plants are also affected; Pythium-root rots of established plantings lead to poor growth and yield losses. Pythium diseases commonly affect nursery and greenhouse production.

Rhizoctonia solani is a common soil pathogen causing damping off, root and stem rots of variety of plant species.

Sclerotinia species, most commonly S. sclerotiorum and S. minor are causal agents of stem and soft rots of many agronomic crops such as celery (pink rot), lettuce (lettuce drop), tomatoes (white mold) and ornamentals (cottony rot).

Sclerotium species cause damping-off, stem canker, crown blight, root, crown, bulb and tuber rots on wide variety of plants, including vegetables, legumes, and cereals. Diseases caused by these species are often called Southern blights or wilts.

Verticillium dahliae, a causal agent of Verticillium wilt is a true soil-borne pathogen that can survive in soil for up to 15 years as microsclerotia. Another Verticillium species, V. albo-atrum also causes wilts but is differentiated from V. dahliae in that it does not produce sclerotia. Verticillium species attack over 200 plant species including vegetables, flowers, strawberries, fruit trees, field crops and shade and forest trees. 

Whether the aim is to determine the causal agent of a disease problem of enumeration of the levels of soil-pathogen population before planting, our testing services are designed for your needs.

AL&L offers testing for the most important soilborne fungal pathogens. Contact us for the appropriate sampling procedures for each pathogen.


Spring Brings New and Old Diseases at the Vineyard
21 March, 2016

Many of the diseases or problems ailing the grapevines can be spotted in spring after the vines start growing. Infected vines commonly show delayed bud break, or develop shorter shoots or abnormal leaves. Reasons for these symptoms, however, can be many, and a more in depth analysis provided by a diagnostic laboratory is often needed to find out the actual cause of the symptoms.

 

Graft Union Infected with Vine Decline Fungi

Graft Union Infected with Vine Decline Fungi

Fungal diseases caused by vine decline fungi (Phaeoacremonium andPhaeomoniella species) are often the culprits of delayed growth in spring. Infections caused by these fungi can remain silent for many years until vines become stressed due drought, overcropping, etc., which makes the symptoms to appear. In such stress conditions these fungi produce toxins that interfere with the vine’s normal growth. Vines infected by these fungi just do not have the stamina to push the way the healthy vines do.

 

Cylindrocarpon canker

Cylindrocarpon canker

Cylindrocarpon-infected vines also show growth delay in spring. After closer examination and removal of the bark in the soil line, these vines can show brown/black cankers at the crown area. After so much of the vine’s water conducting tissues being compromised by the disease, there is not enough surface area to support the new growth. Depending on the amount of the injuries, these vines often collapse in the heat of the summer.

 

Eutypa Canker

Eutypa Canker

Canker diseases of grapevines caused by Eutypa and Botryosphaeria become easily detectable after the vines come out from the dormancy. Dead spurs or arms are often the first indication of the presence of these diseases. Eutypa can also cause curling or cupping of leaves, or shriveling of the berries. These symptoms are caused by the Eutypa-toxins that travel from the cankers into the sites of new growth. 

Neoscytalidium Canker

Neoscytalidium Canker

 


This year, AL&L Crop Solutions detected a newly described pathogen of grapes, a Botryosphaeria-related fungus, called Neoscytalidium diminatum. The fungus was detected from young vines grown in Sonoma county. Affected vines had shown poor growth, and in some cases the vines had suddenly collapsed. Large cankers were detectable in the trunks of these vines.Neoscytalidium, which also causes disease on walnuts, was found first time on table grapes in Coachella Valley, in 2013.

Pierce's Disease

Pierce’s Disease


Pierce’s disease can also be detected by an observant eye during spring. Keeping in mind that the symptoms are not the same as they are in the late season. In spring, vines that had been infected by this bacterium in the previous season, start showing delayed growth and chlorotic leaves. Some of the viral diseases of grapes can also cause growth delays and the infected vines can be spotted in spring. Leafroll viruses and vitiviruses have been often detected in underperforming vines in spring. Some clients also claim that Red Blotch infected vines had were developing shorter shoots.

Grapevine fanleaf disease infected vine

Grapevine fanleaf disease infected vine


Early summer will also bring out symptoms of fan leaf and other nepoviruses. Vines infected with these viruses commonly grow leaves with yellow mosaic, or yellow veins, and sometimes leaves may be of abnormal shape. Since many viruses can cause these types of symptoms, spring testing can rule out whether any of these viruses are present.  

 

 

Blackfoot canker

Blackfoot canker

Bot canker

Bot canker

Young Grapevine Canker

 


Do not miss the Booth 343 at the Unified Symposium!
19 January, 2016

It's time for the Unified Wine and Grape Symposium in Sacramento, January 26-28, 2016.  Come and visit our booth, No 343, located on the 1st Floor of the Main Exhibition Hall of the Convention Center.

We look forward meeting with you and discussing about the newest issues in grapevine diseases and their detection (Pinot Gris Virus and GLRaV-3). Also, if you have any specific disease-related issues on your vineyard, our staff is here to help you and answer all your questions. 


Pierce's Disease: Spotting Springtime Symptoms
01 May, 2015

Pierce’s disease can be detected by an observant eye during spring. Keeping in mind that the symptoms are not the same as they are in the late season. In spring, vines that had been infected by this bacterium in the previous season, start showing delayed growth and chlorotic leaves. Some of the viral diseases of grapes can also cause growth delays and the infected vines can be spotted in spring. Leafroll viruses and vitiviruses have been often detected in underperforming vines in spring. Some clients also claim that Red Blotch infected vines had were developing shorter shoots.

Many of the diseases or problems ailing grapevines can be spotted in spring after the vines start growing. Infected vines commonly show delayed bud break, or develop shorter shoots or abnormal leaves. Reasons for these symptoms, however, can be many, and a more in depth analysis provided by a diagnostic laboratory is often needed to find out the actual cause of the symptoms.

Click here or on the image below to read our full article on spotting Springtime Disease Symptoms in the Vineyard.

 

 


28 February, 2015

AL&L Crop Solutions moved to

7769 N. Meridian Rd.

Vacaville, CA 95688

(530) 387-3270

(707) 693-3050


Spring Brings New and Old Diseases at the Vineyard
19 May, 2014

Many of the diseases or problems ailing the grapevines can be spotted in spring after the vines start growing. Infected vines commonly show delayed bud break, or develop shorter shoots or abnormal leaves. Reasons for these symptoms, however, can be many, and a more in depth analysis provided by a diagnostic laboratory is often needed to find out the actual cause of the symptoms. Spring Disease Symptoms

Fungal diseases caused by vine decline fungi (Phaeoacremonium and Phaeomoniella species) are often the culprits of delayed growth in spring. Infections caused by these fungi can remain silent for many years until vines become stressed due drought, overcropping, etc., which makes the symptoms to appear. In such stress conditions these fungi produce toxins that interfere with the vine’s normal growth. Vines infected by these fungi just don’t have the stamina to push the way the healthy vines do. 

Cylindrocarpon-infected vines also show growth delay in spring.  After closer examination and removal of the bark in the soil line, these vines can show brown/black cankers at the crown area. After so much of the vine’s water conducting tissues being compromised by the disease, there is not enough surface area to support the new growth. Depending on the amount of the injury, these vines often collapse in the heat of the summer.

Canker diseases of grapevines caused by Eutypa and Botryosphaeria become easily detectable after the vines come out from the dormancy. Dead spurs or arms are often the first indication of the presence of these diseases. Eutypa can also cause curling or cupping of leaves, and shriveling of berries. These symptoms are caused by the Eutypa-toxins that travel from the cankers into the sites of new growth.

A newly described pathogen of grapes, a Botryosphaeria-related fungus, called Neoscytalidium dimidiatum, has been detected this year by AL&L Crop Solutions. The fungus was detected from young vines grown in Sonoma county. Affected vines had shown poor growth, and in some cases the vines had suddenly collapsed. Large cankers were detectable in the trunks of these vines. Neoscytalidium, which also causes disease on walnuts, was first found on table grapes in Coachella Valley, in 2013.

Pierce’s disease can also be detected by an observant eye during spring. Keep in mind that the symptoms are not the same as they are later in season. Spring symptoms of this disease appear on the vines that had been infected in the previous season as delayed growth and chlorotic leaves. 

Some of the viral diseases of grapes can also cause growth delays and the infected vines can be spotted in spring. Leafroll viruses and vitiviruses are often detected in underperforming vines in spring. Some clients also claim that Red Blotch infected vines were developing shorter shoots. 

Early summer will also bring out symptoms of fanleaf and other nepoviruses. Vines infected with these viruses commonly grow leaves with yellow mosaic, or yellow veins, and sometimes leaves may be of abnormal shape. Since many viruses can cause these type of symptoms, spring testing can rule out whether any of these viruses are present. 

For more information on the testing services, Contact us:

AL&L Crop Solutions, Inc.

45133 County Rd 32B, Davis, CA 95618

Tel: 530-387-3270

www.allcropsolutions.com

 


Soil, nutrient or disease related issues? One stop by our booth #2302 at Unified will give you answers for both!
29 January, 2014

Wanted to get information about disease testing and nutrient testing this year? Now you can get that all by visiting our booth #2302 at the Sacramento Unified Wine Symposium. Learn how to take samples for each specific situation. Discuss with plant pathologists and soil scientist experts on your vineyard's needs and specific situations. Meet them face to face, and get the answers that you need!

AL&L Crop Solutions & Dellavalle Laboratory Booth #2302

Sacramento Unified Wine and Grape Symposium, January 29-30, 2014.

 


Come see us at booth No. 2302 at the Unified Wine and Grape Symposium on January 29-30!
24 January, 2014

Meet us at our booth (No. 2302) at Unified Wine and Grape Symposium in Sacramento, on January 29-30, 2014.
Come and see what's is new in grapevine disease testing. And of course, find out about the latest news on Red Blotch research and investigations.
We are also available to discuss best sampling protocols for your testing needs.


24 January, 2014

Meet us at our booth (No. 2302) at Unified Wine and Grape Symposium in Sacramento, on January 29-30, 2014.
Come and see what's is new in grapevine disease testing. And of course, find out about the latest news on Red Blotch research and investigations.
We are also available to discuss best sampling protocols for your testing needs.


"Lab analysis of root rot diseases" presentation by AL&L Crop Solutions at AAIE Conference in Napa
25 January, 2013

AL&L Crop Solutions cordially invites you to attend a presentation by Dr. Anna-Liisa Fabritius at AAIE Ecological Pest Management Conference in Napa Embassy Suites on February 4th at 1.30 pm.

The presentation will include information about current lab methods in diagnosis of root rot diseases.

Register for this event at http://aaie.net

 

 

 

 


MEET US AT UNIFIED WINE AND GRAPE SYMPOSIUM THIS YEAR!
16 January, 2013

Visit us at our booth #11 and see what's new and in season for grapevine disease testing!

When: January 30, Wednesday (9-6 pm) and January 31, Thursday (9-4 pm)

Where: Sacramento Convention Center, 1400 J Street, Sacramento, CA


Red Blotch Disease of Grapes – An Incomplete Story
13 November, 2012

Red Blotch Disease of Grapes – An Incomplete Story

This past summer, two research groups, one in Cornell and the other in UC Davis, reported discovering a novel DNA-virus from grapes. The virus was named as Cabernet Franc -associated virus (GCFaV) by the group in Cornell, and as Grapevine red blotch associated virus (GRBaV) by the scientists in UC Davis. The latter name was given because of the symptoms, blotchy red leaves with red veins, that were found to be associated with the presence of this virus.

 Because of some misleading alarmist information has been released to growers, we at AL&L Crop Solutions found it necessary to clarify the status and the significance of this virus.

 First, before GRBaV can be named as a causal agent of the red blotch disease, a lot more research and information need to be obtained.  Just the fact that the organism has been found to be associated with the disease, does not make it a pathogen, capable of causing the disease.

In plant pathology research, when a finding of an organism in a host plant, such as grapes, is made, very careful studies need to be completed where the organism, as a pure culture, is back-inoculated to a healthy vine that does not harbor that organism. Then, the same symptoms that were observed in the original vine have to be reproduced in the newly inoculated vine. Moreover, from that inoculated, symptomatic vine, the same organism it was inoculated with, needs to be recovered. These steps, also called as Koch’s postulates, have to be fulfilled before the organism gets a title as being a causal agent of the disease. For Red blotch disease, these steps have not yet been fulfilled.

 Second, the GRBaV is apparently a novel-type of DNA virus, and only distantly related to geminiviruses, a group of DNA viruses causing significant diseases in other crops.  While it shares some structural similarities with viruses in that family, its genome is significantly different with only 50% similarity at sequence level.  This means that it is too early and too speculative to make assumptions about the significance of this virus in grapes.

 With any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact a plant disease diagnostic professional:

 Anna-Liisa Fabritius, Ph.D                                         .

Plant Pathologist

AL&L Crop Solutions, Inc.

45133 County RD 32B

Davis, CA 95618

Tel: (530) 387-3270

Email: info@allcropsolutions.com

Website: www.allcropsolutions.com

 

 


Real-time PCR for the Detection of Grapevine Viruses
23 May, 2012

AL&L Crop Solutions, Inc. is moving to the Real-time:

AL&L Crop Solutions offers now the Real-time PCR technology for the detection of grapevine viruses.

The Real-time (qPCR) is among the newest and most sensitive diagnostic technologies currently available. It provides several advantages compared to the standard RT-PCR and ELISA methods: qPCR detects broader range of virus variants and lower virus concentrations.

Sampling guilines for the qPCR assays are the same: Collect three to six pieces of basal canewood, each six to eight inches long, from different locations from an individual vine. Amount needed for the qPCR assays is minimal, but since the viruses are not evenly distributed within the vine, sampling from different sites of vine increases chances of detection.

For the futher information on how to sample and send samples for the laboratory analysis, please check on our web-site at http://www.allcropsolutions.com


Sustainable Vineyard Practices
23 May, 2012

AL&L Crop Solutions,Inc. is proudly sponsoring a NVG Season Event: Sustainable Vineyard Practices Part III: Fan Leaf & Nematodes. 

Join us in Yountville Community Hall, 6516 Yount Street, Yountville Tuesday, May 29, 2012 from 8 a.m.-11 a.m.

http://www.napagrowers.org/events/nvg-events-2012/sustainable-vineyard-practices-series/part-iii-root-pests-fan-leaf-nematodes/


Springtime disease symptoms at the vineyard – What to look for?
13 April, 2011

Spring is one of the best times for observation of grapevine disease symptoms. One of the first springtime symptoms of virus-infected vines is delayed bud break. New growth in vines infected with a nepovirus, such as fanleaf virus, is often stunted and leaves may be distorted or chlorotic. Yellow coloration along the veins (vein banding) may also develop.

New growth in vines infected with Pierce’s disease from previous season is often slow and new shoots are stunted. Leaves may also appear deformed and chlorotic.

Springtime symptoms of vine decline disease caused by Phaeoacemonium spp. and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora are also indicated by delayed growth. Newly emerging shoots are weak with less vigor.

Vines infected with canker fungi often show delayed bud break along with stunted and weak shoot growth. Leaf symptoms of Eutypa dieback that appear usually later in spring or early summer are unique to Eutypa. Toxins produced by Eutypa fungi cause leaves in infected vines grow small, distorted and cupped.

Spring field surveys and inspections are available at AL&L Crop Solutions.

Please contact us for more information : Tel: (530) 387-3270 or go to http://www.allcropsolutions.com

 


AL&L Crop Solutions, A CDFA Approved Laboratory, Joins Wine Industry Network
01 April, 2011

AL&L Crop Solutions is dedicated to providing plant disease diagnostic services to California’s as well as other states’ agricultural industry. We are a disease diagnostic laboratory specializing in diseases of wood perennials grapevines, fruit and nut trees.

  • We also provide testing for diseases of field crops, berries, vegetables, bulbs and turf.
  • Our soil testing services are designed to detect most important soil-borne pathogen impeding agricultural production.
  • Our customers include growers, nurseries, agricultural consultants management and service companies.
Our diagnostic services provide our customers a competitive edge:
  • Early diagnosis of disease problems allows for timely control strategies resulting in savings.
  • Screening of propagation material prior to planting assures the health and productivity of your crop






Title Name Email Phone
Plant Pathologist Anna-Liisa Fabritius info@allcropsolutions.com (530) 387-3270
Laboratory Manager Lana Dubrovsky info@allcropsolutions.com (707) 693-3050
Adobe Acrobat File

Sample Collection Guidelines


Clients collecting samples from the LBAM and EGVM quarantine zones:

Current CDFA instructions are:
1. Grower/shipper at origin of the sample shall be under a compliance agreement with the County Agricultural Commissioner of shipping origin AND a copy of their compliance agreement shall accompany each shipment
OR
If the first condition cannot be met, the grapevine sample (still) needs to be certified at the county of origin's Agricultural Commissioner's office being free of LBAM and EGVM AND the certificate of this check needs to accompany the shipment.

2. Grapevine samples need to be packed in double-layered leak-proof plastic bags within a sturdy leak proof container.  This can be accomplished by placing individual samples in a zip lock bag AND by placing these bags into a larger zip lock bag.


3. The box needs to be marked with the following information: The name and address of the shipper or owner and the name of the county where plants were grown and a statement of the contents. If providing samples of roots, please shake off dirt and place roots into a separate bag. Do not let soil contaminate the box or leak outside of the box.


Contact us with any further questions.

Out of state customers:

Contact laboratory for shipping instructions. Before shipping, please download and attach a copy of the P526-10-00117 permit. Download P526-10-00117 permit here..

Soil Pathogen Testing Services at AL&L Crop Solutions

Some economically important plant diseases are caused by pathogens that are present in soil. Many of these organisms have developed specialized survival structures such as hardened mycelial packs (sclerotia) or thick-walled spores (chlamydospores or oospores). These specialized structures ensure pathogens' survival in harsh soil environment. Many of these so-called soilborne pathogens persist in soil over long period of time, from one growing season to another, even if environmental conditions don't support disease development. When optimal conditions (right moisture, temperature, and presence of a host plant) arise, these soil-borne pathogen structures often serve as source of inoculum for disease development.


Whether the aim is to determine the causal agent of a disease problem or enumeration of the levels of soil-pathogen population before planting, our testing services are designed for your needs.


AL&L offers testing for the most important soilborne fungal pathogens including:
(Click on each for more information)

 

Fusarium 

Macrophomina

Phytophthora

Phoma terrestris

Phytophthora

Pythium

Rhizoctonia

Sclerotinia

Sclerotium

Verticillium

 

Contact us for the appropriate sampling procedures for each pathogen.

Grapevine Testing Services at AL&L Crop Solutions:

Bacterial and Viral Diseases:

  • Grapevine Red Blotch associated virus (NEW)
  • Grapevine leafroll virus (GLRaV) types 1,2,3,4,5,7,9
  • Grapevine leafroll virus 2 RG-strain
    (Rootstock stem lesion associated virus)
  • Grapevine viruses A,B, D (GVA,GVB,GVD)
  • Grapevine rupestris stem pitting associated virus (RSPaV)
  • Grapevine rupestris stem pitting associated virus-Syrah strain (RSPaV-Sy)
  • Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV)
  • Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV)
  • Grapevine Syrah virus (GSyV-1)
  • Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV, grapevine yellow vein disease)
  • Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV)
  • Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV)
  • Agrobacterium (crown gall)
  • Xylella fastidiosa  (Pierce's Disease)
  • Phytoplasmas

Fungal Diseases :

  • Vine Decline Fungi (Phaeoacremonium spp. and  Phaemoniella chlamydospora)
  • Canker diseases (Eutypa, Botryosphaeria, Phomopsis etc.)
  • Oak Root Disease (Armillaria mellea)
  • Black Foot Disease (Cylindrocarpon spp.)
  • Powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator)
  • Downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola)
  • Botrytis cinerea
  • Summer bunch rot (Cladosporium, Penicillium and others)
  • Phomopsis cane and leaf spot (Phomopsis viticola)

Panels offered:

  • Short Screen Panel
    (GLRaV 1-3, GVB; optional: GFLV, Xylella fastidiosa)
  • Wide Screen Panel
    GLRaV 1-9, GLRaV-2RG, GVA, GVB, GVD, RSPaV, RSPaV-Sy, GFkV, GFLV
  • Leafroll Panel
    GLRaV 1,2,3,4,5,7,9, GVB
  • Vine Decline Panel
    Phaeoacremonium spp., Phaemoniella chlamydospora, Cylindrocarpon spp.
  • Spring Panel
    Nepoviruses including GFLV, ToRSV, TRSV, ArMV
  • Make-your-own Panel
    Allows you to design your own panel of tests
  • Individual tests also available!
  • Not sure which panel to pick?
    Let our experienced diagnosticians help you in choosing right sets of tests for your purposes.
  • On- site visits and diagnosis also available.

Sample collection guidelines:


Collect sample in appropriate times of the year :

  • Fall through the dormant season is the best time for detecting many of the  grapevine viruses
  • Spring  and early summer is the ideal time for sampling if nepoviruses (GFLV, ToRSV) are the culprits
  • Fungal pathogens can be sampled and detected throughout the year

  • Sampling guidelines may vary de pending on the purpose of testing
  • For detection of bacterial and fungal diseases, take sample from symptomatic parts of the vine. Graft union, crown and roots should be included in the sample suspected for vine decline disease and Agrobacterium.
  • For detection of viruses, ideal sample is taken from individual symptomatic plants (See Figure).  Sampling from different sites of the same vine increases chances of detection since the pathogen propagules are not evenly distributed within a vine.  Mature canewood is good material throughout the year.  For spring-time nepovirus tests, young shoot tips can be collected.
  • For virus screens in propagation material, follow up the above sampling guidelines for virus testing.

  • Sampling for Grapevine Viruses
  • Sample should consist of 5 canewood pieces, each up to 6 inches long, and selected from the basal portion of canes in different locations of an individual vine. Composite samples are not recommended. Leaves and petioles can also be included in a sample.
  • Place each sample into its own bag and label the bag accordingly. Proper labeling will help you to identify the vine and match it with the test results for that vine.
  • Keep the samples cool. Ice packs (blue ice) wrapped with a newspaper in a cooler together with samples is recommended.
  • Sign and include a sample submission form with your sample.
  • Ship your samples for delivery within 1-2 days to: 
    AL&L Crop Solutions
    7769 N.meridian Rd
    Vacaville, CA 95688
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